Hyperion: The tallest tree in the world is out of reach of people

The tallest tree in the world “Hyperion” is currently not allowed to be visited and seen by tourists and visitors.

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Hyperion is a coast redwood in California considered the world's tallest known living tree, measuring 115.92m. Hyperion was discovered August 25, 2006, by naturalists Chris Atkins and Michael Taylor. The tree was verified as standing 115.55 m tall by Stephen Sillett.

Hyperion is considered as the tallest tree in the world, with a length of 115.54 meters.

For hundreds of years, the tallest tree in the world, known as Hyperion has stood quietly among its fellow giants deep within Redwoods National and State Park in Northern California. Inaccessible by trails, Hyperion, a coast redwood, can be reached only by bushwhacking through heavy vegetation and crossing a river.

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California's Redwood National Park is urging visitors to stay away from Hyperion — and the area around it — which have been damaged as a result of the tree's popularity.

"As a visitor, you must decide if you will be part of the preservation of this unique landscape — or will you be part of its destruction?" the park wrote in a statement last week.

But now, Anyone who gets too close to Hyperion, the tallest tree in the world, at Redwoods National and State Parks in California, could face six months in jail and a $5,000 fine.

"Forests grow by the inch and die by the foot," the statement said. "A single visitor can make a drastic negative change to an environment."

Hyperion may be a record holder, but the statement argues that it doesn't match the hype and that trying to see it isn't worth the penalty. The tree is tall, but its height is difficult to observe from the ground and the trunk isn't impressive either.

"Hyperion's trunk is small in comparison to many other old-growth redwood trees," the statement said. "There are hundreds of trees on designated trails that are more impressive to view from the tree's base."

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